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Artist Title Score Label
Palace PALACE - Master Of The Universe (Review) 91 Frontiers
DGM DGM - The Passage (Review) 85 Frontiers
King Company KING COMPANY - One For The Road (Review) 88 Frontiers
Cruzh CRUZH - Cruzh (Review) 83 Frontiers
Tesla TESLA - Mechanical Resonance Live (Review) 85 Frontiers
Meat Loaf MEAT LOAF - Braver Than We Are (Review) 35 429 Records
Dare DARE - Sacred Ground (Review) 94 Legend Records
Q5 Q5 - New World Order (Review) 65 Frontiers
Trick Or Treat TRICK OR TREAT - Rabbit's Hill Part 2 80 Frontiers
Circa CIRCA - Valley Of The Windmill (Review) 75 Frontiers
Crazy Lixx Crazy Lixx - Sound Of The Live Minority (Review) 86 Frontiers
First Signal FIRST SIGNAL - One Step Over The Line (Review) 91 Frontiers
Jorn JORN - Heavy Rock Radio (Review) 87 Frontiers
Dan Reed Network DAN REED NETWORK - Fight Another Day (Review) 76 Frontiers
Withem WITHEM - The Unforgiving Road (Review) 89 Frontiers
Yngwie Malmsteen YNGWIE MALMSTEEN - World On Fire (Review) 45 Yngwie
Vega VEGA - Who We Are (Review) 96 Frontiers
Phantom 5 PHANTOM 5 - Phantom 5 (Review) 80 Frontiers
Ted Poley TED POLEY - Beyond The Fade (Review) 96 Frontiers
Sunstorm SUNSTORM - Edge Of Tomorrow (Review) 77 Frontiers
Epic EPIC - Like A Phoenix (Review) 86 Escape
Zingo ZINGO - Zingo (Review) 80 Renegade Sounds
Rage Of Angels RAGE OF ANGELS - The Devils New Tricks (Review) 92 Escape
Chris Ousey CHRIS OUSEY - Dream Machine (Review) 90 Escape
Coda CODA - Coda (Review) 40 Z Records
Treat TREAT - Ghost Of Graceland (Review) 99 Frontiers
Drive She Said DRIVE SHE SAID - Pedal To The Metal (Review) 82 Frontiers
Shiraz Lane SHIRAZ LANE - For Crying Out Loud (Review) 70 Frontiers
Innerwish INNERWISH - Innerwish (Review) 88 Ulterium
Circus Maximus CIRCUS MAXIMUS - Havoc (Review) 93 Frontiers

Pages

Sat
10
Sep

PALACE - Master Of The Universe (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
91%
Produced By: 
Michael Palace & Daniel Flores
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Rock
Score: 
91
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
 
Palace is another new Swedish discovery for Frontiers Records and the world. Primarily the band is formed and performed by Michael Palace, credited as vocalist and guitarist as well as co-producer alongside one of Frontiers’ go to guys – Daniel Flores.
The 4 piece band is essentially for live performances, the studio credits behind this album assign Michael Palace to vocals, guitars, bass and keyboards and Daniel Flores drums and additional keyboards.
 
Much like other newcomers Cruzh, Palace is a pure 80s outfit, heavily reliant on keyboards, but delivering a heavier sound overall with guitars the more dominating feature.
Swirling keyboards, layers of guitars and fast moving 80s themed melodic hard rock is the order of the day, wrapped in a very tight Flores production.
 
Some of the songs really do trade off the glory days of 80s rock, but with enough power to sound fresh today. Fans of Brother Firetribe will delight in such songs as the massive anthem Part Of Me and Cool Runnin’; while the ballad Rules Of The Game is one of the year’s best.
However, I think the 3 best tracks of all are the final 3.
She Said It’s Over is a is a glorious little moody anthem with a killer hook; Stranger’s Eyes is a smooth slice of Street Talk styled AOR and Young Wild Free is a bubbly, feel good anthem to close out the album in mid-80s style.

Highlight of the month I think. A very strong debut featuring a few songs that have end of year Best Of qualities. Michael Palace has a very likable voice and Daniel Flores again delivers in the produces chair. Revised sequencing might even add another point or two.
Categories: 
 
Sat
10
Sep

DGM - The Passage (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
85%
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Progressive Melodic Metal
Score: 
85
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
You need a bit of variety in your music and this month it is DGM from Italy, presenting their 8th studio album! Yes, 8. This is however the first I’ve heard from them, but it’s enough to get my attention right from the start.
Performing a mix of progressive metal and European symphonic hard rock, Evergrey singer Tom Englund and Symphony X guitarist Michael Romeo both appear as special guests and the band thanks both bands plus Secret Sphere, Pagan’s Mind and Circus Maximus in their liner notes.
That should give you some indication of where the band sits musically.
 
That established, it is all about the songs and much like others of this ilk, this record is not a one-listen and appreciate kind of deal. Its only over repeated listens that the true melodies and the intricacies of the songs show themselves.
There’s a lot of Dream Theater in these guys too. The hooks and chorus structures aren’t obvious, but they are there.
Songs range from 2 to 8 minutes in length, with melodies often revealing themselves in the vocals within verses, much like that of Circus Maximus.

I can’t quite rank this album up with the artists that influence the sound of DGM, but the impressive and likeable lead vocals, plus the intelligent arrangements and powerful performances do make this album one to remember and check out if you’re a fan of the progressive way of life.
 
Categories: 
 
Sat
10
Sep

KING COMPANY - One For The Road (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
88%
Produced By: 
King Company
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Hard Rock
Score: 
88
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
More new talent and I can only say that is a good thing – this scene needs new blood to survive, but we need really great talent for any longer term benefits.
Looks like King Company is one of those bands. Yet another Scandinavian outfit, these lads from Finland deliver classic 70s hard rock with a heavy dose of Deep Purple and Rainbow with organ to match and the extreme Joe Lynn Turner like vocals from Pasi Rantanen.
 
This album rocks with a rhythm section ready to crush ears and a guitarist that knows his way around a fretboard.
The classic meets modern feel of this band is going to deliver them fans, no question.
The sonic blast of Shining and In Wheels Of No Return are bombastic hard rockers with killer hooks and Coming Back To Life is prime 1980s Rainbow.
There’s some vocal similarities to Mats Levin too – and his band Dogface.
Tracks like Wings Of Love and Holding On are hard, heavy and melodic enough for all rock fans to appreciate.

Dramatic, heavy throughout, commercial enough to contain some very good hooks and performances from these veterans of the Finnish scene that really blow the roof off when cranked.
A thoroughly fabulous debut and one for fans of classic rock and the likes of Heaven & Earth to get hold of.
 
Categories: 
 
Sat
10
Sep

CRUZH - Cruzh (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
83%
Produced By: 
Cruzh
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
AOR
Score: 
83
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
 
Great to see Frontiers investing in new talent and this month sees a double header of more Swedish melodic goodness.
First up is Cruzh (crush) – a new three-piece (with a guest drummer) delivering an album of polish Scandi AOR with a strong keyboard driven 80s sound.
Think very early Bon Jovi mixed with the keyboards of Only Child, but with the vocals of REO’s Kevin Cronin gone glam? That make any sense whatsoever?
 
There is an aspect of sugary sweetness that might be a tad too sweet for some. And I do think the vocals can be a weak point within some areas on the album – the glam angle is played up on some songs.
 
The high points of the album are the riff driven First Cruzh; the anthemic Aim For The Head; the mid-tempo moodiness of Survive; the 80s rock radio styled You and the feel good fast moving Set Me FreeAn ambitious 7 and a half minute power ballad Straight From My Heart closes the album. The last couple of minutes are pretty spectacular.

A strong debut featuring a throwback sound and style, but a crisp production. The albums best songs point towards a bright future. Hopefully they can build on this for many years to come.
Categories: 
 
Sat
10
Sep

TESLA - Mechanical Resonance Live (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
85%
Produced By: 
Tesla
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Hard Rock
Score: 
85
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
I love this album from the bottom of my heart. Well, the original at least! Mechanical Resonance is I think, one of the greatest debut albums of all time. It’s still the best Tesla album ever (although their catalogue is wonderfully consistent) and it’s hard to believe its 30 years old.
Recorded over the course of a tour of the USA, the original 12 songs are compiled here in order of that magnificent debut in a very nice tribute to it.
 
The band is still kicking ass and there was never going to be any question of how good these songs were going to sound. They rock of course!
The only fear I had was going to be the quality of Jeff Keith’s voice. 30 years of rockin and rollin will do a lot of damage to a vocalist and its clear to hear that he has aged and the pitch is a little rougher and raspier, but hell, he still sounds good to me and the energy portrayed by him and the whole band on these performances means that Mechanical Resonance is given the fitting tribute it deserves.
 
A 13th track is a preview from the band's upcoming new studio album co-written and co-produced with Def Leppard's Phil Collen. A great taste of what's to come too. A mid-tempo melodic rocker that's old-school Tesla.

A nice raw, rough and raspy rock n roll retro rollercoaster.
 

 

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Fri
09
Sep

MEAT LOAF - Braver Than We Are (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
35%
Produced By: 
Paul Crook
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Rock
Score: 
35
Label: 
429 Records
Artist: 
 
Braver Than We Are is apparently Meat Loaf’s last album. Even if that wasn’t the intention, once the fanbase gets hold of this, that will be the end result. This is a career killer.
The bravest aspect of this release is how anyone other than Meat Loaf would want to put their name on it. And I don’t say any of this lightly. I’ve had the album advance for nearly 2 months now and I have to force myself to play it to review.
Now, before the abuse from card carrying Meat Loaf fan club members starts – people who maybe have never read this site before – let’s get a couple of facts straight.
 
Firstly - Jim Steinman is one of the greatest songwriters of this age. I’ve got everything he has ever done. Ever. And Meat Loaf is Jim’s greatest foil. He takes his songs and elevates them to a majestic level that no other artist has been able to reach. Some have come close (Bonnie Tyler, Air Supply & Pandora’s Box), but Meat is (or was at least) one of a kind.
I’ve got every Meat album too. We know they are a little hit and miss, but a couple of his recent efforts since Bat 2 were pretty damn good. This isn’t. At all.
 
I rate Bat 1&2 as two of the best pomp rock albums in history. But as much as I hate to say it, Meat is done. And I’ve lost a lot of respect for him recently as he continues to mime his way across the world on a farewell lap he should have taken a decade ago. I’ve seen Meat live. He was amazing, but the health problems and the lost voice suggests he should have retired on top.
 
Not only has Meat’s voice sunk to a level hitherto uncharted by any recording artist I can recall, but the songs just don’t work as a cohesive release here. The sporadic nature of their origins gives the album a disjointed approach that perhaps could be glued together by a dynamite performance from the big man, but when he fails to show up, the scattered nature becomes so much more obvious.
 
The album opens in bizarre fashion. Who Needs the Young is a track more suited to the opening of a circus than a bombastic rock album. And it is at the 1 minute 40 mark that the fate of this entire album is determined. That’s 5 seconds after Meat starts “singing” and you realize that his voice is absolutely shot.
The jazzy, cabaret style 1920s tune might sound completely at home amongst other similar tracks in one of Steinman’s musicals, but this 5-minute romp is possibly one of the worst lead album tracks in recent memory.
 
The 11 minute plus Going All the Way Is Just the Start (A Song in 6 Movements) is everything I love about Jim Steinman’s epic songwriting. Had Meat recorded it 10 years ago, I’m sure it could be another huge hit. All the required elements of a Steinman epic are here – pounding piano, ever changing tempos and bombastic overtures. It’s a great song and my favourite of the album I guess, but only because the starring role is taken by vocalists Ellen Foley and Karla DeVito. Meat’s vocal parts sound labored and painful at times and even in a support role they detract from the female leads. The production is also lacking that hands on Steinman stamp – the drum sound in particular is of little impact.
 
And already we have a ballad in play – the sparse piano and acoustic guitar driven Speaking in Tongues is all about the vocals, but it’s missing that big booming voice required to take it to any level worth remembering. Stacy Michelle tries to lift it, but instead it labors along and kills any momentum set up by the last track.
 
Loving You's a Dirty Job (But Somebody's Gotta Do It) features Stacy Michelle once again trying to mask how bad Meat’s unsteady, barely in tune vocals are. Another terrific song from Jim, but one that’s some 30 years old and delivered better back in the day by Bonnie Tyler. Love Stacey’s voice, but her performance is not enough to make the song what it could have been.
 
Another epic is up – the 8 minute Souvenirs kicks in with some subtle horns and then one of Meat’s most wobbly vocals of the album. God I hate typing this. The brass plays on through the track and takes us back to the early days of Meat & Jim, but the track really doesn’t get going until the 5-minute mark, when the vocals lift along with the tempo, but there really isn’t any reason for this track to run so long.
 
Only When I Feel is one of those quirky short Steinman songs that’s just a little left of centre and typically acts a circuit breaker on his albums. And I like the premise here – but once again, I’m sorry to say, but Meat’s vocals are barely listenable. I love the passion he’s trying to deliver and I can feel him hurting, its emotional. But it’s just soul destroying to hear.
 
Then we dive straight into the completely over the top, hard rocking More. It’s the first time the angst and the passion has really boiled over on this relatively restrained album. The track retains its gothic overtones from the original Sisters Of Mercy recording back in the day and it does suit the big man, but it stands out as a little out of place. Once again female lead vocals are brought in to get Meat through the song.
 
Godz is just completely bizarre. More a spoken word track, with a heavy, bombastic guitar sound, it’s another interesting left turn from Steinman, but I think won’t be received that well in the context of the rest of this album.
 
Skull of Your Country is another piano ballad with more female lead (this time featuring Cian Coey) morphing part of Total Eclipse Of The Heart with a new verse and chorus. More music than vocals (yet again), it’s an ok song that you just wish was more over the top.
 
Closing this sorry album is the crappy fast moving pop/rock Train of Love, featuring a horrible chorus, really poor programming and a totally forgettable hook. What a disappointing way to finish a disappointing album.

This is a truly horrible way to end a grand recording career. The whole album just doesn’t gel – from the missing “Jim” factor (collaborating from afar hasn’t worked), to the restrained almost laid back feel of the album, to Meat’s vocal performance – words just can’t describe that. I'm sure Meat will say it's all intentional, but no-one sings like this intentionally. And if his voice isn't completely gone, why is he miming on stage?
I’m beyond disappointed and this comes from a lifetime Steinman/Meat Loaf fan. I doubt I’ll ever play this album again.
 

 

Categories: 
 
Thu
04
Aug

DARE - Sacred Ground (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
94%
Produced By: 
Darren Wharton
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Europe
Musical Style: 
AOR
Score: 
94
Label: 
Legend Records
Artist: 
 
The Celtic AOR legend that is Dare rides again! Darren Wharton’s majestic band return with studio album number 7, Sacred Ground, their first set of new material in 7 long years.
There’s always a lot riding on a Dare release, as they aren’t the fastest band around when it comes to delivering new albums. And speaking frankly, the two albums preceding this – Arc Of The Dawn and Beneath The Shining Water – while offering a taste of what we all love about this band, still managed to come up a little short when thinking back to the band’s unsurpassable classic debut Out Of The Silence.
That album remains an iconic release and one of the best AOR albums of all time.
 
So what does Dare 2016 mean for fans? Well, the return of the masterful Vinny Burns on guitar is certainly a stroke of brilliance. And he makes his presence immediately known, with Sacred Ground awash with precision soloing and a stronger guitar footprint than the last few albums.
 
While the tempo remains circumspect, Vinny’s guitar takes the songs to the next level, delivering the rock edge that fans have wanted. Yes, tempo is far more ‘up’ than recent work and like past Dare albums, it does take several listens to get to know the tunes. The similar pacing makes it a little harder to separate the songs initially, but as always with Dare, it is all about mood.
And no one does mood better than Darren Wharton and Vinny Burns.
 
And I have to say, I have a huge appreciation for Darren’s vocals. He IS British AOR for me.
In essence, this is a wonderful album that takes a step back from the Celtic influences of recent times and a huge step back towards straight ahead moody AOR, with songs that could quite comfortably fit on Calm Before The Storm and even a few that wouldn’t be out of place on Out Of The Silence.
 
There are no fillers here – 11 great tracks of keyboard and guitar framed music – but there are a few tracks I’d especially like to single out.
The opening number Home is everything I love about Dare. Strength is a nice mid-tempo AOR track with some sublime playing from Vinny Burns and another killer vocal from Darren.
Days Of Summer is the most rocking thing I have heard from Dare since the band returned in 1998.
The almost ‘happy’ On My Own features a good pace and another shining guitar solo.
All Our Brass Was Gold is a really nice mid-tempo ballad with orchestration lurking in the background.
Like The First Time is another schooling on how to do mood and melody together and the closer Along The Heather is classic Celtic Dare, but in a more uptempo wrapper.

What’s not to like? This is a great comeback for the band and a most refreshing welcome home for Vinny Burns, who adds immeasurable class and power to these songs.
And major props to Darren Wharton for the flawless production and crystal clear mix on Sacred Ground. There are many many layers to this album and such a great production is what makes it fun to discover each one.
 
Categories: 
 
Thu
04
Aug

Q5 - New World Order (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
65%
Produced By: 
Q5
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Hard Rock
Score: 
65
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
So Q5 return for album number 3, a mere 31 years since the cult classic When The Mirror Cracks first appeared.
The Seattle rockers reformed for Sweden Rock Fest a few years back and decided to try and keep things going, with 3 original members joined by a new drummer and second guitarist.
The band’s sophomore album saw them gain a cult following with its more keyboard infused melodic rock, a definite change of pace from the rawer 4-chord rock n roll of Steel The Light.
 
So which Q5 do we have in 2016? I’d best describe this album as a mix of the heavier AC/DC style of Steel The Light and something new. There really isn’t anything here that finds influence from When The Mirror Cracks. Personally I find that a shame, as it’s the album I clearly preferred by the guys.
 
The reality is that New World Order is an ok album for what it is – a raw, dirty, rock n roll album with gravelly vocals and a riffing guitar dominated sound – but is that what Q5 fans were awaiting?
It’s definitely a classic rock album – there’s some Uriah Heep, some AC/DC, some NWOBHM influences – it’s pretty easy to get the picture.
There are some ok song, but not enough to make it an essential purchase. They are all pretty simple bar-room boogie hard rockers, a couple of double time shufflers and a couple of slower moments too.

I’m not warming to this album though. The songs are very basic and very raw production doesn’t give the music a lift that might have helped. I’m not feeing the vocals and I’m not feeling the overall vibe either. To be honest, it’s not a band recognizable from the past. It’s a new take on an old name.
 
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Thu
04
Aug

TRICK OR TREAT - Rabbit's Hill Part 2

information persons: 
content: 
80%
Produced By: 
Simone Mularoni & Trick Or Treat
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Metal
Score: 
80
Label: 
Frontiers
 
 
This is a strange one. Not known for their high profile, the Italian rockers still managed to find themselves on Frontiers to release the sequel to 2012’s Rabbits' Hill, Pt. 1.
Trick Or Treat deliver their 4th and most accomplished album here, but it’s still not something that’s going to have universal appeal.
For example, the album kicks off with a triple speed kick-drum driven frenzy, only to give up that momentum for a 2.5 minute acoustic renaissance piece that might seem more at home on a Blackmore’s Night record.
 
Then it’s a fast moving melodic rocker with a good serve of powerhouse drumming and big vocals from the somewhat accented delivery of Alessandro Conti. The guy can sing, no doubt.
And if you’re questioning the album title, let me confirm that the lyrics are indeed a concept piece about our fluffy little friends with the cute big ears.
It’s different alright!
 
Elsewhere in the album we have a fast moving anthem Efrafa; a nice melodic ballad Never Say Goodbye (featuring duet vocalist Sara Squadrani); a double time melodic hard rocker The Great Escape; the metal menace of They Must Die (not the bunnies….no!); and an 11 minute operatic epic called The Showdown. Closing the album is an over the top farewell to the furry ones called Last Breath. Very dramatic stuff.

The band is clearly growing in stature and this album has a solid production base for the eclectic songs featured. The lyrical content is a little bizarre, but musically, it’s all business. Fans of European melodic metal and hard rock should investigate.
Categories: 
 
Thu
04
Aug

CIRCA - Valley Of The Windmill (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
75%
Produced By: 
Circa
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Progressive Rock
Score: 
75
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
I’m not a fan of Yes. Never have been. Well maybe parts of 90125 and Big Generator, but otherwise no. Just not my thing. However, you cannot fault the musicianship or the song writing credibility of a band that has delivered for fans for over 40 years.
Circa is formed by current Yes member Alan White (drums), former Yes member Tony Kaye (Hammond, keyboards), current Yes member Billy Sherwood (bass, vocals), and guitarist Jimmy Haun, who played on the Yes album Union.
 
So match that information with the fact the album features just 4 songs and you should know exactly what you’re getting here.
Some quite brilliant instrumentation and some very Yes friendly higher pitch vocals layered over heavily progressive and innovative rock music.
The shortest track is 7 minutes and the longest is 18.
 
Ok, so it’s not my thing and it clearly is an album that will only appeal to progressive rock fans and Yes devotees, so my opinion isn’t going to mean much in the scheme of things.
What I can say is that it’s recorded nicely. Production is solid and the album is mixed with a nice balance of vocals and instrumentation with a musical bed that’s pretty light, certainly not a hard rock affair.

This review is more or less to advise the curious as to what’s on offer here and keep AOR and hard rock fans away from it. Yes alumni – you guys should eat this up if you have the time to devote to getting to know the inner workings of the songs.
 
Categories: 
 
Thu
04
Aug

Crazy Lixx - Sound Of The Live Minority (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
86%
Produced By: 
Crazy Lixx
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Hard Rock
Score: 
86
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
All any Crazy Lixx fan needs to know about this album is – does it sound any good?
Yes it does. Of course it does! Crazy Lixx kick ass!
 
And here on this career covering live album are 13 hard hitting tracks of glorious Scandi-melodic hard rock.
Does the live set cover everything? No, probably not. There’s always a song here or there some fan wished included, but for the most part the guys cover their bases.
 
The anthems Rock In A Hard Place, Lock Up Your Daughter, Sound Of The Loud Minority, Riot Avenue, Girls Of The 80s and the closing 21 Til I Die are all there and performed with great energy and enthusiasm.

It’s good stuff! Nuff said. If you’re a Crazy Lixx fan, you need this. Simple. A nice, raw, energetic live recording of a band that knows what they are doing!
Short review, but a simple one.
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Thu
16
Jun

FIRST SIGNAL - One Step Over The Line (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
91%
Produced By: 
Daniel Flores
Running Time: 
47
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Rock
Score: 
91
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
Harry Hess returns with a sequel to 2010’s First Signal debut. The lead role of Mr. Hess is about all that is in common from the debut to this album.
 
Normally I’d jump in and complain that if you are using a project name, you should stick to the original personnel of that project, as swapping musicians/producers/writers generally leads to a completely different sounding album (Sunstorm and Allen/Lande for example).
But in this case, I’ll let it pass as the results speak for themselves.
 
Daniel Flores (Find Me, Murder Of My Sweet) and his new buddy Michael Palace are the duo behind all the music, whilst the songs are provided by an array of the current artists within the Frontiers stable.
 
Flores produces and delivers results that sonically improve on that of the debut – even if the style is a little different. The Dennis Ward moody AOR debut is trumped by this bubbly, more keyboard driven 80s sounding affair with at times a more aggressive edge, but overall an improved sound that isn’t far from the AOR of the two Find Me releases.
Harry is of course in fine voice over 11 tracks that hold a pretty consistent sound and quality. At times the keyboards are a little “too 80s”, but there is no doubt that this is a very fine release.
 
Highlights include the punchy She’s Getting Away; the sentimental ballads Still Pretending and Weigh Me In; the early Harem sounding One Step Over The Line and Love Gets Through; the angst of Broken and the moodiness of Kharma.

Hess, Harem and fans of the First Signal debut shouldn’t give owning this a second thought. Why haven’t you got it already? Essential for anyone who appreciate fine vocals and some catchy traditional melodic rock.

 
Categories: 
 
Thu
16
Jun

JORN - Heavy Rock Radio (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
87%
Produced By: 
Jorn
Running Time: 
57
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Hard Rock
Score: 
87
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
The man is back, again! One should stop saying that as Jorn never really departs, such is the consistency of his releases. That’s not always a positive, but the last couple of records have started to return me to my former status of worshipping the great man.
One thing the world probably doesn’t need is another covers album, even more so another Jorn covers album (this is his third, plus half of the debut album), but you know what – you can’t help but like large parts of this collection.
It’s Jorn being Jorn and its produced extremely well.
 
Jorn has managed to pick out some less predictable covers from areas of pop/rock from the 70s through to today and a few cuts from his more familiar influences.
Some work, some don’t. But the ones that do work are sensational, as Jorn metalifies some pop classics such as I Know There’s Something Going On and Running Up That Hill. I think there should have been more like these two on here. Jorn sounds fabulous.
Foreigner’s Rev On The Red Line is something he could record in his sleep (his version of Break It Up from the debut is still untouchable) and sounds great as does his version of the John Farnham legacy number You’re The Voice (since covered by many). I love his liner notes about each track and especially the praise he gives Farnham as a live vocalist. I wasn’t sure the song would suit Jorn, but it does.
 
Paul Stanley’s Live To Win is one track I thought Jorn would slay, but for some reason this heavier and rawer version seems to lose some of the melodies that the original carried.
Don’t Stop Believing is a fine version with a surprisingly high Jorn vocal. But honestly, I’m so sick of this fucking song – even the original I could do without hearing ever again. For Jorn’s tribute to Steve Perry, check out Edge Of The Blade from the debut – one of the best Journey covers I’ve ever heard. Wish he’d tried out Ask The Lonely instead.
 
Killer Queen is pretty decent too, but I have a hard time with anyone aside from JSS covering Queen. Jorn brings a good swagger to the track.
Hotel California is one you’ll either love or hate – but I dig it. Jorn’s rasp works and the guitar work on this iconic song does the original justice.
 
Well, we lasted this long without Rainbow/Sabbath/Dio/Purple, so we may as well close the album with songs from 3 of the 4 featured, plus an authentic Iron Maiden cover for good measure, giving the last 15 or so minutes a more familiar metal feel.

All in all – good stuff. A few fairly safe choices and some risks that pay off. I prefer the pop/rock tracks being beefed up rather than the metal tunes just being covered.
A lot of thought has gone into this album and Jorn sounds great as always.
 
Categories: 
 
Thu
16
Jun

DAN REED NETWORK - Fight Another Day (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
76%
Produced By: 
Dan Reed
Running Time: 
57
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Pop / Rock / Funk
Score: 
76
Label: 
Frontiers
 
Can’t say I was ever a Dan Reed Network fan – his funk/rock style was something that I just didn’t embrace back in the day. However, I have admired a couple of Dan’s latter day solo albums. Some intelligent songwriting and out of the box musical arrangements there.
I had no expectations going into this, and what it delivers is a bit of both Dan Reed’s worlds.
 
Given the crossover in styles, it does appear a little disjointed and a little hit and miss. The hit resonates with me in a big way. The misses make the album drag, especially through the latter stages.
 
What hits – the brilliant melodies and subtle arrangements of the opening track Divided and the mature melodies of The Brave; the beautiful atmospheric ballad Champion and the equally pleasant keyboard styled B There With U.
The softer pop/rock of Heaven also connects as does the moody Stand Tall.
 
Misses include the funky ballad Infected; Give It Love; the funk/reggae swagger of Save The World which goes nowhere and the programmed beats of Reunite.
There’s a few others too, making this album about half cool, half not so.

An interesting album in parts, but perhaps not what the Dan Reed Network moniker might suggest. For that reason I think it aims to please all, without hitting the mark. Or perhaps it’s just exactly how Dan feels and writes in 2016. Up to individual fans to decide on this one.
But those few tracks in the first half of the album are seriously good.
Categories: 
 
Thu
16
Jun

WITHEM - The Unforgiving Road (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
89%
Produced By: 
Oyvind Larsen
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Progressive Melodic Metal
Score: 
89
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
 
Withem are a new progressive/melodic metal band NOT from Sweden! Yes indeed. They are not from Sweden. They are from Norway!
Once again the Scandinavians prove to be on the cutting edge of new music in all forms of rock n roll.
This is the band’s second album and first for Frontiers. They describe their sound as a mix of inspirations from such greats as Symphony X, Pagan’s Mind, Dream Theater and Circus Maximus. Pretty accurate too.
 
To me they haven’t quite got the chops of Dream Theater, nor the melodic finesse of Circus Maximus, but they are well on their way. And this is an impressive album.
I’d put their sound closer to Dream Theater thanks to the vocals of Ole Wagenius. His powerful LaBrie style range drives these songs and adds the melody to the powerful guitars and swirling keyboards.
 
This is an impressive sounding album. Guitarist Oyvind Larsen acts as producer and mixer and has done a remarkable job. This is a really clear and crisp sounding record while retaining all the necessary power.
 
Highlights include the powerful hook driven In The Hands Of God (the chorus is pure Circus Maximus); the initially faster, but then inter-changing pace of The Pain I Collected; the beautiful vocals and melodic guitar parts that drive Riven; the Rob Moratti-esque progressive AOR of The Eye In The Sky.

It took several listens to appreciate fully and have the melodies become more obvious, but the high caliber production and some inspired performances make this an album that is likely to launch the band onto a bigger platform and wider audience.
 
Categories: 
Tags: 
 
Thu
16
Jun

YNGWIE MALMSTEEN - World On Fire (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
45%
Produced By: 
Yngwie
Running Time: 
Yngwie
Release Date: 
Yngwie
Released: 
Yngwie
Musical Style: 
Yngwie
Score: 
45
Label: 
Yngwie
 
Well, it’s not as bad as War To End All Wars. That record should have been titled Album To End All Careers. But somehow the great fret-fiddler Yngwie J Malmsteen continues on.
 
It’s hard to tell who is the most delusional. Yngwie himself for releasing this as is; his record label for actually paying for it to be manufactured or some of his fans who are reacting as if this album is the greatest slice of majestic, audio grandeur and shredtastic splendor since Les Paul took craft lessons in Jnr High.
 
Ok, so it’s not all bad….well it is if you were rating audio quality alone. I’m not sure where this was recorded. It sounds like it was recorded in my grandmother’s 1922 outhouse and pieced together on a 1981 Acorn BBC Micro 6502.
I just cannot understand how and artist, his manager wife and record label could all agree this was release ready. The production quality and muddy mix are just rotten.
 
To the songs themselves – well, the boy can play – no doubting that ever. And before the fanclub hit me up with death threats and witty insults about what really constitutes greatness, please be advised I have most of the Swedish Frethogger’s albums and I remain a strong fan of several in particular.
 
There are some good and bad here. The title track World On Fire is a great 1 minute idea that goes for 4 and a half and most of the instrumentals that follow are simply retreads of past work.
I’m being strangely hypnotized by Yngwie’s vocals on Lost In The Machine. Is he employing mind control to keep fans under influence? I don’t mind that song at all, except for the quality and the fact the vocals sound like they were sung into a Coke can rather than a microphone.
Largo and No Rest for the Wicked are simply the same riff as each other, just played faster and Duf 1220 is the most accurate song title on the whole album.
 
I really do like Yngwie. I think he’s doing an ok job, but his organization is one that cannot be criticized. I’m on their shit list because of my last few reviews – but that’s just part of the job.
This review won’t help of course. What he needs to do is embrace those that want to work with him. There are a number of great musicians from his past that that would happily collaborate with him. But no one wants to work for him.
 
Hopefully he can find the financing to hire a producer or at least a professional mix engineer, get a vocalist on board to work together and collaborate on some great songs that aren’t all widdling and get back to what really made Yngwie Malmsteen albums of the past so enjoyable. He needs an A&R guy to tell him what works and what doesn't. Givie me a call mate!
 
Categories: 
 
Fri
20
May

VEGA - Who We Are (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
96%
Produced By: 
Vega
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Rock / AOR
Score: 
96
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
I love everything about this band– and this album. Their very British classic AOR sound; their edge of your seat pacing and those choruses! Always great choruses.
Vega are at the forefront of the British melodic rock scene. Vocalist Nick Workman has one of the most likeable voices in AOR.
It’s harder to pinpoint the band’s best album now that they are up to number four – they’ve all impressed for similar reasons.
Once again the band’s dynamic works some melodic magic and conjures up another 11 cracking chorus and hook driven songs that cannot be removed from your head.
And producer Harry Hess (yes, him!) brings some element of restraint to the band. I’ve said previously that Nick has the habit of sounding on ‘full’ – all the time. Here there is more light and shade with his vocals and I think it makes him sound even more impressive and also gives the songs more balance.
 
Explode moves faster than ever; We Got It All is darker and moodier; Every Little Monster is pure AOR bliss and Nothing Is Forever is a great power ballad.
White Flag uses the typical Vega build-and-explode method of chorus delivery; For Our Sins is more subtle, but is a terrific memorable melodic anthem; Generation Now turns on the angst and delivers another killer chorus and Ignite turns full-throttle moody.
 
Its throw your hands in the air anthem time with Saving Grace and the lighter feel good If Not You; with Hurt So Bad rounding out an album of anthemic greatness. A wonderful conclusion to an album with zero filler.
 
On the subject of production, I think the snare is not quite in sonic alignment with the deeper tone of the rhythm section, and the vocals continue to be too far down in the mix. But minor points amongst a hundred other positive superlatives.

Nothing I haven’t already said before about this great band – torch bearers for classic AOR and melodic rock in Britain, with enough of a modern edge to make them vital now, not just as another band riding on the past. Another clear winner and possibly their most consistent and anthem filled album yet.
 

 

Categories: 
 
Fri
20
May

PHANTOM 5 - Phantom 5 (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
80%
Produced By: 
Michael Voss
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Hard Rock
Score: 
80
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
 
Phantom 5 isn’t the best or most descriptive band name I’ve heard, but it’s far from the worst. Featuring a powerful lineup of Michael Voss (guitars; Casanova, Bonfire, Mad Max) and Claus Lessmann (vocals, ex-Bonfire) along with popular German compadres Robby Boebel (guitars from Frontline) and Axel Kruse (drums from everyone) as well as Francis Buchholz on bass.
 
Touted as a natural follow up to the classic Bonfire Fireworks album, with a touch of Frontline and Jaded Heart, the expectations were therefore set to maximum from the outset.
Sorry guys, but while the potential is there, the songs don’t carry the legacy any further than that.
There’s too much one-tempo familiarity amongst the songs, not enough variety in style and frankly, not enough power in the choruses to knock anyone over.
 
The album does start strongly though. All The Way certainly has the classic feel of an album opener – a nice fast melodic hard rocker with a typically anthemic chorus.
A nice dose of keyboards and a choppy guitar riff drive the pacey Blue Dog while it gets moodier on Someday.
Don’t Touch The Night harks back to classic 80s Bonfire, even if it lacks a little of the dynamics of the original band.
 
Unfortunately that’s probably the best part of the album over with. The rest settles into a very safe, mid-tempo routine of riffs and raspy vocals, but nothing really stands out.
Renegade, Flying High, Frontline and We Both Had Our Time all have a good sound but fail to ignite when time for the chorus.
Since You’re Gone is a pretty decent rock ballad, but then it’s straight back into the unremarkable second half of this album.
They Won't Come Back is probably the pick of the second half – a better chorus and a nice sentiment on this track.

A solid effort, with expected good production from the always reliable Michael Voss, but the songs and urgency required to make an impact worthy of the personnel involved aren’t there.
A good start, but a fairly routine and safe second half strips back some of the appeal of this album.
 
Categories: 
 
Wed
11
May

TED POLEY - Beyond The Fade (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
96%
Produced By: 
Alessandro Del Vecchio
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Rock
Score: 
96
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
 
Ted Poley has a lengthy and impressive resume, boasting a few all-time classics as well as some revered collaborations.
From Prophet to Danger Danger and through to Poley/Rivera and in recent years a couple of solo albums thrown in there for good measure.
Now Ted is teaming with Mr. Reliable; Alessandro Del Vecchio for a new solo album in a time where it’s more important than ever to stand out from the pack to get any traction.
 
Boy, does he do it in fine style here! Take a bow Ted and Alessandro – you have both done yourselves proud with this record – easily the best Ted Poley album outside of Danger Danger and now one of my favourite records of the year.
This is no project album with Ted delivering some vocals. No way. Ted flew to Europe to work with Alessandro and in his own words, there isn’t a note on this record he didn’t approve of or help engineer. With songs from the incomparable Martin Brothers and Ale himself, Ted has the backing of a powerhouse production, which at times some of his other projects have lacked.
 
And Ted delivers one of the best vocal performances I’ve heard from the evergreen frontman.
There’s a couple of songs on here I’d rate amongst Ted’s best songs ever – and that includes Danger Danger. But do I feel the urge to jump ahead to get to them? No, because the material here is so consistently enjoyable, I can’t possibly skip forward.
 
There’s almost two parts to this record. The opening sequence of the high octane fist pumping trilogy of D2 friendly anthems Let's Start Something, Everything We Are and Hands Of Love get things off to a flying start.
Then there’s the very fine, tempo slowing ballad The Perfect Crime, a duet with Issa (who seems to be the girl to call when a duet is required).
From there things turn a little more serious – but no less melodic or powerful. The tone just shifts slightly.
 
Stars is one of the best Poley tracks ever. Absolute perfection. The high impact chorus is just brilliant.
Higher is less intense, but equally as catchy with another great layered chorus.
The mellower, darker and sentimental Where I Lost You is another slice of melodic rock perfection. Once again, great listening and stands up as another legacy Ted Poley track.
You Won't See Me Cryin' is another winner, it moves a little quicker, maintaining the melodies but adding a touch of grit and a fine quite solo.
We Are Young lends itself to a darker tone while Sirens is just pure joy.
Beneath The Stars closes the album by delivering a 6 minute rock ballad.

No fillers, all killers and a couple of mind blowingly good classics. All class from start to finish.
Wonderful! No further comments needed. Just get it!
 
Categories: 
 
Wed
11
May

SUNSTORM - Edge Of Tomorrow (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
77%
Produced By: 
Alessandro Del Vecchio
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Worldwide
Musical Style: 
Melodic Hard Rock
Score: 
77
Label: 
Frontiers
Artist: 
 
 
It’s funny how these things line up. Two Alessandro Del Vecchio helmed albums released the same day. This time Ale teams with fellow Italian – guitarist Simone Mularoni, guitar player of Italian prog-metallers DGM to write and produce the new Sunstorm album for Joe Lynn Turner, who requested a harder edge to the fourth album in this project’s lifespan.
I don’t have by track writing credits, but Soren Kronqvist and Daniel Palmqvist also contribute songs.
 
Joe Lynn Turner never sounds less than on-form when delivering his vocals, as he is again right here. He sounds as good as ever, so it’s all down to the songs and the sound employed to do so.
Edge Of Tomorrow is a heavier, more guitar dominated record, with keyboards way back in the mix this time around. And without Dennis Ward, as well as the style shift, it’s a pretty different record than the trilogy of albums before it.
 
The first two Sunstorm albums are brilliant. The third was good, but to be perfectly honest, this is going to rank last compared to those. I think the Sunstorm brand has lost some of its personality here. There are some fine songs that kick things along, but several others that I’m struggling to appreciate and despite all albums featuring songs gathered entirely from outside writers, the ones here don’t have the hook impact expected.
 
Don't Walk Away From A Goodbye is a powerful opener with a decent uptempo pace which leads well into the pick of the album - Edge Of Tomorrow. This is one of the best songs of the year if I’m honest. I just wish there was more like it.
Nothing Left To Say doesn’t really go anywhere and fails to deliver a memorable chorus.
Heart Of The Storm is a feisty rocker that I do like, but the chorus and lack of harmony vocals where there should be some leaves it a little flat.
The Sound Of Goodbye is very much the same. The slower ballad shows promise but ultimately sounds really raw as if something is missing.
 
The Darkness Of This Dawn is a slower and more soulful tune with some classy Neal Schon inspired guitar riffs and brings back the harmony vocals which do make a difference.
You Hold Me Down has a decent chorus and a good pace which is followed by the piano ballad Angel Eyes, which I think most will enjoy.
Everything You’ve Got and Tangled In Blue roll along nicely, the chorus’ could have been bigger, but it’s just not the style of this album.
I find the closing track Burning Fire is another that just doesn’t go anywhere sadly.

 
In a word – disappointing. But that’s comparing this to what has come before and what we expect from a JLT project. It’s a little heavier, rawer and without much padding as far as harmonies and keyboards. So it is what it is. Some might even prefer it this way. 
But for me – regardless of style direction, I think the album is missing additional knockout tunes such as the title track.
 

 

Categories: 
 
Mon
09
May

EPIC - Like A Phoenix (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
86%
Produced By: 
Epic
Running Time: 
39
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Europe
Musical Style: 
Melodic Rock / AOR
Score: 
86
Label: 
Escape
Artist: 
 
An unusual album this, but that’s typical of Escape Music. They have a long history of uncovering albums that fit the genre, but operate outside expectations….and deliver quality melodic rock.
 
It’s always good to hear new twists on an old format.
 
Epic are a mix of Canadian, American and Lebanese musicians. Quite something that! The 4 piece is fronted by the powerhouse vocalist Tanya Rizkala, whose deep raspy voice has quite a range and should impress fans of female fronted outfits like Dante Fox, Saraya, Witness and Heart.
 
Musically you can take those acts and add some swagger that isn’t a world away from Mr. Big and Winger, but with a lighter AOR touch.
 
This is a hard rock album in part (All I Need and Nah Nah Nah which book end the album) and melodic rock in others (the anthemic brilliant Love Will Find A Way and Like A Phoenix) and then there’s the pure AOR of the lovely ballad I Can Take You which leads into several slow-to-mid tempo ballady tracks through the middle, including the acoustic Sleepless and the dreamy My Everything.

What starts out as a pretty rocking album heads quickly into mid-tempo AOR, which isn’t a bad thing as the songs and the vocals in particular are quality – it just isn’t what I expected based on the artwork and the opening couple of tracks.
Epic do however, deliver something different for fans of female fronted melodic rock and the strength of the production and songwriting is worthy of investigation.
 
Categories: 
Tags: 
 
Mon
09
May

ZINGO - Zingo (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
80%
Produced By: 
Various
Running Time: 
50
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Canada
Musical Style: 
70s Pop/Rock
Score: 
80
Label: 
Renegade Sounds
Artist: 
 
Zingo is a new release from Renegade Sounds that might slide under the radar of many visiting these pages. This is an outfit from the 70s and the 12 tracks within are sourced from the only remaining original sources – that is some from multi-track, others from quarter inch tape, some from cassette and even original vinyl. But it’s been nicely worked out to maintain a pretty consistent sound quality.
 
What’s remarkable about Zingo is that it’s the first recording band for legendary Bryan Adams guitarist Keith Scott.
Anyone that knows me knows that I’m an absolute sucker for Keith’s tone and his essential role in making Adams the icon he is.
So my interest in hearing this was immediate. It’s not all to my personal taste – I’m not an overly 70s kinda guy, but the songs here are well worth the effort to upgrade and compile.
These are rock/pop and pomp friendly radio tunes with typically 70s groove. Think Early Journey, Boston, ELO.
 
This is a must have for fans of Scott. There are some tunes here that showcase the origins of his sound perfectly and give a taste of where he came from as a guitarist and there are some moments where you can hear early Bryan Adams in the delivery.
And there’s even two tracks produced by Jim Valance for that extra Adams tie-in factor. Keith left Zingo to join Adams for his Cuts Like A Knife album and has remained with him ever since.
 
Packaging is a little minimal – it’s housed in a slimline jewelcase with no tray card, but the disc is a proper manufactured silver CD and there is a booklet.
The label apparently wanted to keep their overseas customers' shipping costs down, and this reduced the weight in half. They are however offering a free tray card if buyers want to put it in a standard jewel case.
 
There are a couple of songs where Keith really goes to town and that makes it all the more worth it as far as I’m concerned. An interesting archival record that’s up to its neck in the 70s.
Sadly vocalist Vince Nardulli passed away in 1989.
 
Categories: 
Release Year: 
2015
 
Mon
09
May

RAGE OF ANGELS - The Devils New Tricks (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
92%
Produced By: 
Ged Rylands / Mixed and Mastered: Martin Kronlund
Running Time: 
69
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Europe
Musical Style: 
Melodic Rock / AOR
Score: 
92
Label: 
Escape
 
This is an impressive follow-up to what was an already impressive debut album. The second Rage Of Angels sees a more focused lineup run through 10 quality AOR/melodic rock songs that feature the talents of Neil Fraser (guitars, ex-Ten); Chris Green (guitars, Rubicon Cross, Tyketto), plus the rhythm section of ColdSpell - Perra Johannsen and Chris Goldsmith; along with Martin Kronlund (guitars).
 
But the brains behind Rage Of Angels is Ged Rylands, former Ten keyboardist who adds guitar to his role in his own band. And for the new album he has enlisted the great Rob Moratti to front the band; giving the album just one singer compared to five on the debut.
Having one singer gives the album a far more cohesive feel and it’s just a bonus that Rob delivers one of the best performances of his career here. His voice dominates and it’s so more satisfying to hear him belt out original material rather than Journey covers.
 
Making Rob sound so good are 10 very catchy, high energy, keyboard drenched rockers. Equally paired in the mix is some blazing guitar work, solos in every song and a brilliant mix from Kronlund has the rhythm section pumping underneath these waves of keys and guitars.
 
Musical highlights are many. The opening epic Rage Of Angels is fast, fabulous and heavy for an album of this genre. But still the keys dominate in a way Royal Hunt fans would be impressed with. All Your Own Way is a more typically AOR style with an anthemic chorus that’s perfect for Rob.
 
On Step Closer is British AOR at its best; while Strangers In The Night is filled with 80s keys, but at the same time ear crunching riffs. In And Out Of Love flows nicely into Stop Changing The TV which weaves a more melodic chorus than the title might suggest!
Long Days With You is the moodiest track and closest thing to a ballad on the album and is a fine closer.

 
A really enjoyable album and a step up from the debut as far as I’m concerned. Rob’s high register vocals are perfect for the material before him and keyboard lovers will love the layers of ivory that prove to be the foundation of this record.
One point I would like to make – 70 minutes for 10 songs is pretty ambitious and there are several tracks here that would have benefitted from tighter control in the editing phase. There are a few killer 4 minute songs wrapped up in 6 minute bodies.
Other than that small point – definitely recommended for classic 80s/AOR fans and fans of Rob Moratti/Final Frontier and Ten.

 

Categories: 
 
Fri
22
Apr

CHRIS OUSEY - Dream Machine (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
90%
Produced By: 
Lars Chriss
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
Europe
Musical Style: 
Melodic Hard Rock
Score: 
90
Label: 
Escape
Artist: 
 
Veteran British vocalist Chris Ousey already has a wealth of impressive material to his name with such acts as Virginia Wolf, Heartland and The Distance.
His debut solo album was a long time coming, but was everything a Chris Ousey fan could possibly wish for, made even better with the production and musical nouse of the great Mike Slamer.
For his anticipated sophomore solo release, there’s no Slamer, but there is drummer/producer Lars Chriss and he has done a very good job maintaining the big punchy sound of the debut.
 
That album was truly outstanding, so I wasn’t expecting as much from this album, but still hoped it would come close. It does.
While the guitar playing and overall production style isn’t as impressive, the sound is still intact and the voice of Ousey makes it all worthwhile.
 
And there are several more absolutely fabulous songs on offer here. A couple of fillers too, but for the most part, this is a high energy, uptempo melodic rock must-have.
 
Opening with the Deep Purple-ish barnstormer This Is The Life, Chris shows he is still the vocalist we’ve loved since the 80s.
Another Runaway is a classically 80s sounding anthem, with a tasteful moody verse before one of the best choruses of the album.
War is possibly the most aggressive track on the album – fast, furious and packing a powerful punch.
Dream Machine continues the fast pace of the album with a funky twist. Not a favourite, but it depends on my mood how much I enjoy it.
Tearing It All Down is yet another fast flowing track with another great chorus. Classic Chris Ousey/Heartland here.
 
The fun continues with Into Your Dream, featuring another strong melodic AOR chorus over a solid groove.
Moment of Madness continues the blistering pace of this album with another great song. A less impactful chorus, but it still does the job.
Gone Long Gone is one track that fails in the chorus department for me; the verse is more impressive as far as vocal melodies.
Better Time to Come kicks the album back into overdrive, with a fast moving melodic rocker featuring another great vocal and chorus.
 
The slower rocking Eager To Please is perhaps another track that doesn’t have the immediate catchiness of other songs.
Return To Me makes up for that with enough melodies for two songs. Another fast and furious rocker.
Flesh On The Bone is a bonus track that wasn’t serviced to media, so I can’t comment on this one.

What strikes me above all else is the quality of Chris Ousey’s vocals. He truly is a wonder and anyone that appreciated Heartland or The Distance needs this album. Fans of the last album might miss Mike Slamer in the same way I am, but the quality of the songs and vocals ensures that the album repeats the ‘must buy’ status of the debut.
 

 

Categories: 
 
Thu
21
Apr

CODA - Coda (Review)

information persons: 
content: 
40%
Produced By: 
Vince O'Regan
Running Time: 
48
Release Date: 
2016
Released: 
UK
Musical Style: 
Hard Rock
Score: 
40
Label: 
Z Records
Artist: 
 
Coda is a new British/American outfit, destined to be regarded by the few that hear it, as an opportunity lost. I don’t like to stereotype, after all, with rock n roll anything is possible any time, so you must have an open mind.
That said, seeing the name Vince O’Regan in the production credits brings me out in cold sweat as my ears slowly retract into my head in an act of self-preservation.
 
And while I once worshipped at the altar of all things Sabu, vocalist Paul Sabu has long since passed his best and now resides in a raspy, gravely realm along with several other legends I won’t name here.
Coda also features CJ Curse on bass and Eric Ragno on keyboards plus Andy Pierce on drums.
 
And while I wanted to be proved wrong, sadly I’m not. Coda is another production death statistic O’Regan can add to his long, long list of (dis)credits – Alibi, Pulse, Legion, Eden, Bob Catley and Escape.
Loud and in your face (did I mention loud?) does not make a good production and as expected, this is another huge sonic mess, with bass parts so loud my speakers threatened to walk out; tinny guitars and badly mixed vocals; plus is Eric Ragno even on here? I can hardly hear his keyboard parts beyond a couple of background fills and some organ in Heat On Ice. The mix is that bad.
 
Vocally Paul does his best, but the voice is unrecognizable from the days of Only Child and it's at times painful to listen to.
Song quality isn’t much better. Land Of The Free and Use It Or Lose It are appalling and Den Of Thieves and One Way Love just sound like a mess, almost unlistenable.
Elsewhere most other tracks just blend into each other. There’s little light and shade here. The only track that holds any interest is One Friend To Another.

Not surprisingly, this is a huge mess and will really struggle to sell. Vince O’Regan needs a producer and Z Records needs a winner. Neither appear to be forthcoming and certainly aren’t on display for this debut album. I’ll be surprised if there’s a sequel.
 
Categories: 
 

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